Amanda Cox

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Amanda Cox

Post  Amanda Cox on Thu Jan 29, 2009 10:25 am

Wombats are the most amazing animals and I am so grateful to have had the opportunity to help them, they have returned that input in buckets. Where I once walked through or drove past "the bush" and couldn't see the ecosystems for the trees, I have a different perspective now thanks to my waddling friends. I can "read" the bush now and know whether kangaroo, wallaby or wombat has passed through a certain track, and find myself laughing out loud as I see signs that indicate what the wombats on my property have been up to overnight. One day it was a pile of scats delivered onto a 15cm high block of wood sitting atop a pile of bricks 60cm high- I would have given quids to see that exercise in progress- another day shows that a dust bath was had overnight and I can just imagine the sprawled out wombat flicking dirt over his or her back. Many a dusk have I spent with a little one filling my boots with dirt doing the same thing. I find piles of scats indicating that someone visited last night or is offended that they have smelled a new orphan lurking around. I see the trenches scraped out and running marks that indicate last night someone got amorous and that leads to the hope that there will be small footprints near the waterways soon. I marvel at how the wombats find the most beautiful places to make their "camps" ( sorry you kangaroo devotees- wombats have much better aesthetics), choosing these perfect places where they can have shade, a bolt hole or burrow, a patch of grass, a place to scratch and of course water. I marvel at their ingenuity as I watch a dam dry up I notice them dig a trench that allows them to drink without sinking in the claggy mud and always I search for a good back footprint. Their pigeon toed back feet rarely leave good prints as they are over trodden by their front feet. And one of the biggest joys and best life lessons is to be loved and depended on for nearly two years by a wombat orphan to be rewarded by them growing to independence and saying "thanks for all the fish" and toddling off to be a big wild wombat. I once made that comment to a group and had someone ask what fish they like to eat!; and that is another joy; introducing others, especially young people, to the mavellous world of wombats knowing that when my time is done, younger and hopefully better educated hands will be there to help. If you get to do one and only one thing more in your life, hold hands with a wombat, smell the aroma of munched grass and deep earth that a wombat wears and see the chaotic joy that is young wombat at play. If you are like me, that will be enough to consider a life well lived. And finally, of those humans who really connect with wombats - you are a wierd mob but (to use another stolen expression); there's not a dud amongst you.


Last edited by Amanda Cox on Thu Jan 29, 2009 10:32 am; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : spelling errors)

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wombat antics

Post  Linda on Wed Feb 04, 2009 1:00 pm

I love your wombat antics stories, Amanda!!

Very Happy

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